Sundance 2022: Living

Mr. Williams is a cog in the public works department of county hall in 1950s London. He’s a buttoned-up fellow, always at a quiet remove from the employees under him, who, in turn, refer to him as ‘Mr. Zombie’ for his listless shuffle and seeming apathy.

A terminal diagnosis shakes Mr. Williams (Bill Nighy) out of his stupor. With only six months to live, Mr. Williams realizes he hasn’t truly been living in quite some time, nor does he know how to now that the countdown’s on. Raised to be the very embodiment of a stiff upper lip, the epitome of repression, Mr. Williams finds it impossible to dissolve the barriers between his son and himself, so he confides instead in virtual strangers. He’s not looking for happiness or personal satisfaction or the meaning of life. He only wants to make some small mark that will remain after he’s gone, a reason worthy of remembrance.

Director Oliver Hermanus adapts Living from 1952’s Ikiru and makes it something so redolent of a certain time and place, a certain way of life, that we instinctively understand much about our Mr. Williams without being told. It helps that the legendary Bill Nighy takes up the lead role, contemplating life and death and the very humble space occupying the in-between.

The film feels poorly constructed, its unusual structure not quite working as it should, the chapters and scenes weighted haphazardly and knitted together without much thought to the whole. And yet I quite enjoyed Living, thanks largely to Nighy’s stellar performance. He reins in his trademark quirks and easy charm for something much more subtle. Mr. Williams may not be a zombie, but he’s almost a ghost even before he’s dead. Funny how an expiry date suddenly makes life feel so much more vital and urgent. His performances overcomes flaws in the filmmaking and I’m certain Living will find a special place in British hearts. Living doesn’t improve upon the original, but it holds its own and gives national treasure Nighy a role to be remembered by.

6 thoughts on “Sundance 2022: Living

  1. Pingback: KisaFilms.com

  2. dr bob

    We first saw Bill in The Girl in the Cafe, a quirky little political film
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0443518/
    but then Wild Target! with Emily Blunt
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1235189/?
    convinced us of Emily’s stardom after The Devil Wears Prada and of Bill’s unique place in modern cinema. What a wacky film that Wild Target, perfectly capturing Bill’s eccentric character that he plays so well. Of course Love, Actually put him in everyone’s spotlight, but we always know he will deliver a special touch to any movie he appears in. Looking forward to this one.

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  3. selizabryangmailcom

    I never saw Ikiru but understand strong reactions to some remakes (West Side Story). Hey, go for Casablanca! Maybe 2001 is next! But sometimes they can be good, thankfully. This one sounds like it has lots of potential…

    Liked by 1 person

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