Coraline

It’s actually nearly impossible for me to believe I haven’t reviewed this one here yet because it’s such a treasure, one that continues to impress me in new ways every time I watch it. Coraline is 10 years old now and it’s safe to say the world of animation has changed in its wake. With Coraline, Laika showed that animated films could be more than just cartoons for kids. With gorgeous, artful sets, thoughtful stories, and dark themes, Laika has distinguished itself as a cut above, and Coraline has set the bar for so much that has come since. They weren’t the first to do this, of course, but they’ve certainly made the biggest impression on American box offices.

I happen to love stop-motion films because it feels like we’re so much closer to the artwork. 24 character puppets were constructed for Coraline, which kept 10 artists busy for four months. The Coraline puppet at one point shows 16 different expressions in a span of 35 seconds. When you stop to think about what that series actually means, the careful minutiae, the attention to detail, the willingness to expend so much work for a few seconds of film, you start to really appreciate the possibilities of stop-motion. Of course, there was no single Coraline puppet, there were 28 made of her alone, in different sizes for different situations. Her face could be detached and replaced as needed. The prototype would be molded by a computer, and then hand-painted by the modeling department. Each jaw replacement was clipped between Coraline’s eyes, resulting in a visible line later digitally removed. There were exactly 207,336 possible face combinations for her character. Just her character! Over 130 sets were built across 52 different stages spanning 183,000 square feet – the largest set ever dedicated to this kind of film.

I like to think about the different people on the set of a movie like this. One person was in charge of making the snow (the recipe calls for both superglue and baking soda, if you’re interested; leaves are made by spraying popcorn pink and cutting it up into little pieces). Someone laid 1,300 square feet of fake fur as a stand-in for grass. Another was hired just to sit and knit the tiny sweaters worn by puppets, using knitting needles as thin as human hair. You have to really LOVE doing this to dedicate your life to knitting in miniature. Students from The Art Institute of Portland had the opportunity to help out – what an amazing induction to a burgeoning industry.

Coraline is an 11 year old girl, recently moved to a new home, and her parents have little time for her. So perhaps she can’t entirely be faulted for falling for a grass-is-greener situation when she finds a secret passageway in the new house and follows it to an alternate universe where her Other Mother is attentive and loving. Of course, all is not as it seems – the Other Mother is trying to keep her there, permanently. It’s dark, but also magical, spell-binding. It absorbs you into this world, which remains in a state of disorienting metamorphosis. The Other World seems inviting at first – utopian, even, to a young girl. But as it unravels, the world looks and feels increasingly hostile; Other Mother herself begins to wear clothing and hairstyles more forbidding and harsh. It reveals itself in a dizzying, undeniable way, the best use of the medium, an unforgettable piece of film.

13 thoughts on “Coraline

  1. Arionis

    It’s also adapted from the book by Neil Gaiman. I’ve recently read his American Gods and Good Omens. I’ve never actually read or seen Coraline. Guess I’ll have to change that.

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  2. The Butcher

    Coraline is one of my favorite stop-motion movie. It is a brave film that manages to give the public a black fairy tale with really wonderful horror moments and really well done.

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  3. Wendell W Ottley

    I’ve always loved this movie. I was even aware that it took lots of work to get it on the screen. However, the stats and details you shared are just staggering. It gives me a whole new level of appreciation for the craft of Coraline.

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  4. In My Cluttered Attic

    I have nice memories of this film. We didn’t catch it in the theater, but in the park downtown on a movie night under the stars one summer. That even added to the magic up on the screen. Our youngest still looks back on this film as the introduction to going out to the movies as being something special, and it was. I didn’t know any background information on it, but I love the behind the scene facts you presented in your post. They were fascinating. Thank you, Jay. Have a great weekend. :O)

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  5. raistlin0903

    Terrific post. I have had this movie on dvd for quite a while, but as it goes sometimes I still havenโ€™t gotten around to seeing this one ๐Ÿ˜Š So…thanks for the reminder! ๐Ÿ˜ƒ๐Ÿ˜ƒ

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