Pride, Prejudice & Rainbows

Everywhere, there are rainbows, co-opted to bring hope and cheer to a world self-isolating from a deadly virus. Normally, a rainbow spotted in June meant Pride Month was being celebrated and acknowledged. This June, however, things are more sedate. Pride events have been cancelled, or moved online at best, to be observed virtually, from one’s home computer. Except home isn’t always a safe space for queer folk. Many have been forced back in the closet, or back into the wrong gender’s clothes and pronouns for the duration, not daring to risk being caught on the wrong website, further isolating an already marginalized population. This pandemic has deprived the queer community of the few safe spaces they can comfortably exist in their own skin: queer bars, sexual health spaces, support groups. Worse still, many of these spaces were already teetering on the brink of inadequate funding when COVID forced shut downs. Many will not reopen. In fact, many queer and trans services rely on Pride Month events for essential fundraising, especially since members of the LGBTQ community were already at higher risk for unemployment, food insecurity, and lack of insurance even before the pandemic hit.

Most of all, though, a pride event is about visibility. It’s about celebrating the victories and honouring the sacrifices and acknowledging the gaps. It’s about giving people a sense of community and belonging. There are still countries where homosexuality is illegal, and even punishable by death. But even many “progressive” countries are still getting it wrong; Trump’s Affordable Care Act rule would allow health care to discriminate against LGBTQ people, the Supreme Court is deciding whether employers can fire people just for being queer or trans, the UK’s Women and Equalities Minister has considered revising the Equality Act to keep trans women out of women’s spaces.

If you are cis and straight, do your part to create and maintain safe online spaces for queer people. Reach out to queer friends and ask if they are really okay. And check out some queer stories because yes, representation matters.

A short list of a rare genre: happy LGBTQ movies

  1. Fourth Man Out
  2. Maurice
  3. Imagine Me & You
  4. G.B.F.
  5. Pride
  6. Jongens
  7. Handsome Devil
  8. Kiss Me
  9. Beautiful Thing
  10. To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything! Julie Numar
  11. Were The World Mine
  12. The Handmaiden
  13. Moonlight
  14. Laurence Anyways
  15. God’s Own Country

9 thoughts on “Pride, Prejudice & Rainbows

  1. Brittani

    Great post! I’ll have to check out some of those films you listed that I haven’t seen.

    Laurence Anyways is such a great movie. I’ve been thinking about that a lot recently, I’m due for a rewatch.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Christopher

    There are too many of these I haven’t seen, although I hope you don’t mind if I add Big Eden to the list.
    It’s twenty years old now but still kind of remarkable to see a film about an openly gay man who moves back to his rural home town where everybody knows he’s gay and is cool with it. It manages to be sweet without being overly cloying.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. victoriarose002

    I agree that pride is definitely abiut visibility and the freedom of expressing yourelf and being proud of you are. As opposed to have to hide it. Makes me sad how many people are having to be silent constantly about their sexuality or gender atm because of being in lockdown.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s