Leave No Trace

This is a special breed of movie. In a summer of blockbusters, this quiet movie is a stand-out, a necessary refuge from the storm of testosterone and TNT playing at the local cineplex.

It’s about an army vet, Will (Ben Foster) who has made a home for himself and 13 year old daughter Tom (Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie) in a national park, where they read books, grow and forage food, and live a peaceful, low-stress existence. Until, that is, a small mistake trips them up and they are apprehended by park rangers and social services. Though Tom is obviously well-cared for and has been MV5BMjExNWUzZDItMTdmMS00ZjQ5LThlZTktYTE0Y2RhNzEzOWRkXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNzM1MTc3ODg@._V1_educated beyond her grade level, she should be in school, and have a roof over her head. At least that’s what the social worker says. But once housed and employed, things get sticky. Tom is a curious and lively teenager, making friends and thriving in her new environment. Her dad struggles to assimilate, and he’s largely unable to cope.

Trust me, I know the description sounds ordinary, but the execution is flawless.

  1. The casting is impeccable. Ben Foster isn’t a big, bankable name but he’s every casting director’s wet dream. He brings intensity and gravitas to every role he encounters, and the stoic approach he takes with Will is perfect, though few other actors would give themselves permission to try such subtlety. Opposite him, Thomasin McKenzie is fabulous. The movie is all about their dynamic and it only works if both halves of their little family unit is working in synchronicity. Tom is obviously bright but McKenzie gives her such a sense of vulnerability that we never lose sight of what’s at stake.
  2. The script, by Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini, is such a luxury. They find so much value and beauty in simplicity that I’m astonished at how much I felt for what amounts to a fairly sparse script. The difference is, they’ve edited carefully, they’ve pared it down to the essentials, and tuned them ever so carefully. What’s left is a lot of room for the actors to be comfortable and take ownership. Room for the director to make her mark. It’s so smartly-written. It would be easy to find melodrama in these circumstances but instead Granik and Rosellini consistently find empathy and dignity and it makes weepy just to write about it.
  3. The cinematography is astonishing. At times it looks like an expensive nature documentary – one that fits seamlessly into a feature film. Someone (Michael McDonough) took a lot of care with this. He films the park with such loving and patience we get the sense of how at home the characters are in this special place. By contrast, the city looks colder, less inviting.
  4. Granik’s direction is flawless. As you may be surmising from everything written so far, there isn’t much in the movie, not even silences and blank spaces, that aren’t actively working for the plot or the characters. And by keeping things trim, it forces the audience to be active too. The keys are all there, and the deft direction encourages us to pick them up, sort them out. This movie respects its characters and its audience – objectively, the events and circumstances are tragic, but they’re communicated with such restraint. It’s easy to have sympathy when no one is asking for it. Will and Tom do not describe their situation as homelessness, and the movie lovingly backs them up in this.

This movie is so thoughtful and caring and it shows a different model for living and loving with no judgment. There’s no malice, no villains. Even the social services are shown to be well-intentioned. But Will and Tom are hardly the only outcasts, and Leave No Traces embraces them as well. It has room in its heart for everyone and even though there is much to be sad about, the film is so sweetly assembled that I left the theatre with a little pocket of hope in my heart. There are no easy answers, but Granik’s gaze is fair and honest and I’m just bowled over by every inch of this movie. It’s a rare and precious thing, and though it may be called Leave No Trace, it actually leaves quite a mark.

 

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22 thoughts on “Leave No Trace

  1. raistlin0903

    Ben Foster is amazing. I love how this actor can play pretty much every role (and is often unrecognisable in every movie). Ever since I saw the trailer for this movie I have been looking forward to it. Nice to know that it’s been worth the wait. Great review! 😀

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  2. Paul. Writer and Filmmaker

    Great review and agree with the praise you give the film. The theme of just “being” in nature and alive, rejecting the horrors of the capitalist and war-mothering world is so well evoked. I, personally, craved slightly more drama at the end but the filmmakers committed to understatement and delivered expertly.

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  3. Lavanya

    It’s sad that movies like these are not watched by many and hence they don’t release globally. I guess I’ll have to wait until it gets on Netflix or prime.

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    1. Jay Post author

      Yes, it only came to our art-house theatre, so I got there while I could. I’d heard good things but didn’t really realize how good – it was 100% on rotten tomatoes!

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  4. J.

    I’ve seen the poster for this at the GFT, but can’t say I knew much about it. Sounds like a proper good one, though… so it’s duly added to the watchlist!

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    1. Jay Post author

      Yeah we just saw our first trailer for it at a press screening the week before. It’s the kind of movie that usually comes and goes quickly, but it’s so well-reviewed this one has some legs, and will eventually have a huge presence on netflix.

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  5. Liz A.

    I’m so glad Ben Foster didn’t end up like many child stars. He’s grown into a fine adult actor. I had read something about this movie, but I wasn’t inclined to see it. Maybe…

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