The Hollars

I’m really struggling to write this review. I’m even struggling to tell you why I’m struggling with the writing. The thing is, I quite liked the movie, liked it a lot for a movie that is perhaps not meant to be ‘liked.’

It’s about a family that comes together awkwardly when things go bad. Matriarch Sally (Margo Martingale) falls ill – a tumor in her brain requires surgery. Her husband Don (Richard Jenkins) thought symptoms including numb extremities and partial blindness were due to her weight, and sent her to Jenny Craig. Their son Ron (Sharlto Copley) has just been fired from the family business where his dad was his boss, and is living in his parents’ basement. John (John Krasinski) leaves his job and pregnant girlfriend (Anna Kendrick) to be by his mother’s side but it’s immediately obvious why this family doesn’t come together more often. The dynamic is a MV5BMjIwMTEzNjY3OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjg2OTY1OTE@._V1_SX1500_CR0,0,1500,999_AL_little…sticky. And perhaps in the days before a serious surgery, The Hollars could use a little less hollering and a lot more making amends.

You’ll already have noticed that this movie has a super stellar cast, and everyone’s acting like their jobs depend on it (haha – movie joke). But this could easily have just felt a little light-handed and a little familiar, but between writer Jim Strouse and director Krasinski, they manage to keep it light but not superficial.

What I adored about the film is its characters – every single one flawed. And yet even Don is sympathetic, perhaps not caring for his wife as he should but absolutely terrified of life without her. These people feel real. I feel like I’ve sat in waiting rooms with them. Crises do not bring out the best in them. They still do the wrong thing and say the wrong thing and they don’t have picture-perfect moments around the old hospital bed. Real life doesn’t work like that, and neither does this movie.

So that’s what I liked about The Hollars: the connection. Somehow it opened a creaky door to my dusty heart and beamed a bittersweet chunk of real life straight in. Dysfunction doesn’t magically iron itself out just because someone has a brush with death, but in hospitals round the globe you’ll see families trying their best to muddle through, putting on brave faces, eating vending machine junk food instead of dinner, navigating the complicated familial fault lines of in-laws and exes, making good decisions and bad decisions, wiping away secret tears, hassling doctors, re-reading the same page of a magazine twice, three times. It’s what we do. It’s not particularly dignified or graceful or entertaining, and it’s not usually the stuff movies are made of. But once in a while they sneak one through, and it’s how we know we are not alone, that other people look just as bad in bathrobes, that other families have embarrassing conflicts, that other sons have survived seeing their mothers vulnerable and scared, and lived to tell the tale.

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17 thoughts on “The Hollars

  1. Christopher

    I’m starting to feel bad for Margo Martingale.
    She’s brilliant and I love her work and she’s perfect for a role that requires this level of complexity and depth, but because she’s so talented and perfect for these sorts of roles that it just seems like her mere appearance means family secrets will be spilled and people will die.

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. Tom

    Nice review Jay. I really want to check this out. Not least because your piece, but also…Krasinski. Is there a nicer guy who is blowing up on the scene right now?

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Jay Post author

      It’s true, and that just makes him all the more endearing – can’t wait to see what he does next as this movie is so different from A Quiet Place genre-wise, and yet they’re both about families at the end of the day.

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  3. The Inner Circle

    I have had this on my radar for a while and am hoping to pick it up next weekend during my video store dollar sale….Jenkins is pretty damn good in whatever part he plays…..

    Like

    Reply
    1. Jay Post author

      Yeah, it’s nice that he was able to break out of the sitcom role and not only make a movie career, but with writing and directing as well, he’s a genuine film maker.

      Liked by 1 person

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